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Archive Fever

August 26, 2009

Seated on a bench by the campsite at the Park of Hanging Rock, I was reading an article (in PDF format) for a class that I eventually dropped (due to having arrived at a credit limit and also because of having to juggle TAing with four other classes). It was “Archive Fever: Uses of Document in Contemporary Art.” I am struck by a phrase that I could not still quiet discern even after having read the entire article. It is on p16 “…the archive is a compensation (in the psychoanalytic sense) of the unwieldy, diachronic state of photography and, as such, exists as a representational form of the ungainly dispersion and pictorial multiplicity of the photograph.” The article is rich with examples and descriptions of artistic representations that often try to perform, simulate and assimilate the nuances of the Real as way of critique of policies, politics and human behavior. The idea of archive as a way of exposing myth-making and creating its own myth to counter existing myths. Also an act of subterfuge, uncovering hidden process by way of simulated reverse engineering. I will certainly like to talk more about the possibilities of archives simulated via art…bascially aspects of the paper.

The science of archive, the science of memory.I’ve downloaded the readings just before deregistering. I wonder if I can find the time by next week to try to sit in on some days? I have to ask the professor, as I do not yet know her. And I did not attend the first meeting, as I’m tired and I have work to do.

Drat

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